Department of Geography and Anthropology

Resources / Course Descriptions

Descriptions of courses offered by the Department of Geography and Anthropology are listed below. While every effort has been made to keep this list as current and up-to-date as possible, please consult your student handbook for the most current descriptions.


NOTE: Course credits given in the following format "0-0-0" translate to:
class hours - lab hours - total credits

Anthropology (ANTH)

  • ANTH 1102 - Introduction to Anthropology

    • Introduction to anthropology’s four major subfields: biological anthropology, archeology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics.
    • Prerequisites: None.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 2105 - Social Issues: Perspectives in Anthropology

    • This course provides students with the knowledge and tools necessary to critically examine world social issues from the social science perspective of anthropology. The discipline of anthropology examines the effects of cultural behavior on contemporary issues and problems confronting people around the world.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099.
    • Credits: 2-0-2
  • ANTH 2220 - The Anthropology of Death

    • In this course, students examine how anthropologists have looked at the topic of death from a multitude of perspectives. Students explore the importance of death to the field of anthropology and also use it as a lens to examine American attitudes toward and rituals surrounding death.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 2777 - Anthropology of Tourism

    • This course introduces students to anthropological explorations of tourists and tourism. It enables students to understand the deep cultural impact of contact through reading historical and contemporary ethnographic works of tourism and tourists. It helps students distinguish and locate similarities between different forms of tourism and tourists, and their respective impacts on cultures and identities.
    • Prerequisites: None.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3300 - Anthropological Theory

    • This course surveys the historical development of anthropological theory. It emphasizes the major theories and theoreticians in the discipline of anthropology and their importance for understanding contemporary anthropological research.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3307 and any two of ANTH 3301, ANTH 3303, ANTH 3305
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3301 - Human Origins

    • This course is an introduction to the evolutionary origins of humans. Major topics include evolutionary theory, primate behavior and taxonomy, the fossil record of human and non-human primate evolution, and the interaction of culture and biology as it relates to human evolution.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3303 - Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology

    • Languages constitute the social life and cultural practices that anthropologists study. This course introduces the student to anthropological approaches to the study of language use, which is distinct from a linguist's approach to language. Students learn how languages shape and reflect our thoughts and identities. Students examine the complex world of meaning-making, which form the fundamental component of our social, political, economic, and cultural life.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3305 - Principles of Archeology

    • Archeology is the subfield of anthropology that has as its goal the understanding of the human past by studying the material remains that people leave. This course will cover the history, goals, methods, and theoretical base of current technology. Cultural resource management will be introduced as well.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3307 - Cultural Anthropology

    • The comparative study of human cultures and societies through use of cross-cultural analysis of human behavior and case studies. Major foci are comparisons between universal and culturally relative aspects of human behavior, comparative social organization, cultural change and adaptation, and contemporary global cultural problems.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3310 - Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

    • The interrelated issues of culture, race, ethnicity, identity, gender, and social stratification in American society are examined through a holistic and comparative perspective with an emphasis on the examination of case studies.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3315 - Indigenous Peoples of the Southeast United States

    • An examination of the culture of the prehistoric, historic and contemporary Native Americans of the Southeastern U.S. including the Mound Builders, Cherokees, Creeks, Choctaws, and Seminoles.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3320 - Lab in Physical Anthropology

    • This course provides students with practice in techniques used by physical anthropologists in areas such as: human skeletal anatomy, forensic anthropology, paleontology, primatology, human growth and development, and population genetics. In addition, students get an introduction to important literature in the field. This course is a prerequisite for some upper division physical anthropology courses
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3301 (or concurrent enrollment) and MATH 1107.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3321 - Indigenous Peoples of North America

    • The study of contemporary issues affecting Native American peoples through a survey of traditional cultures and culture change.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3335 - Archeology Field Techniques

    • This course is an archaeological field course designed to teach students the skills and techniques of modern archaeological survey, excavation, and laboratory analysis. The site of the local field school varies from year to year, but the international opportunity is an archaeological site in Belize, Central America. Contact the professor prior to registration for the determination of credit hours.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3305
    • Credits: 3-6 Credit Hours
  • ANTH 3340 - Religion, Magic, and Culture

    • This course examines the anthropological approach to religion and magic, which privileges local religious experiences and practices and places them in socio-cultural context. This course encourages students to consider the roles that religions play within broader adaptive systems, and how religions alternately promote both cultural stability and cultural change. Cosmologies, religious systems, and magical systems of thought are explored from an anthropological perspective.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3307
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3345 - Food and Culture

    • This class takes a global look at the social, symbolic, and political-economic roles of food, including how people in different cultures and environments throughout history define themselves through their foodways. The course explores a cross-cultural range of identities and socialities built through food production, preparation, and consumption, and how these change over time.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3307
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3350 - Cultures and Societies of the World

    • A comparative survey of culture and social organization in various regions of the world with a focus on contemporary social problems, cultural change and adaptation.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3307
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3355 - Capitalisms and Cultures in Asia

    • This course compares and contrasts various forms of capitalisms and cultures in Asia to understand the dynamics of society and political life. This course enables students to develop a global perspective on critical issues that concern policymakers, business-strategists, development-workers, and academics from an anthropological perspective. Students compare and contrast various forms of capitalism in Asia from an anthropological vantage point for understanding dynamics of society and political life in Asia.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3360 - Anthropology and Africa

    • This course introduces students to methods, theories, and topics in African historical and contemporary anthropology. Particular emphasis is placed on how people from the West have encountered and come to understand African peoples and vice versa. This course examines how the colonial encounter helped structure methodological and conceptual formulations in anthropology and subsequent critiques and revisions. It also examines many contemporary African issues through the lens of anthropology.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3307
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3365 - Afro-Brazilian Culture and Politics

    • This course explores the Afro-Brazilian experience in multi-racial Brazil, where the majority of the population is of African descent. This course will focus on how Afro-Brazilian culture, politics, music, samba, capoeira (martial arts), carnival and religion have impacted and often defined Brazilian society and culture. The course also focuses on Brazilian racial identity, social movements and racism. Brazil is constantly situated within the African Diaspora.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102 or AADS 2100
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3375 - Engaged Archaeology

    • Although archeology is a scholarly subject, it is not divorced from contemporary issues. In this class, students learn the role that archeology plays in various publics and communities. Students identify and engage stakeholders related to an archaeological site and undertake a hands-on project such as developing a heritage management plan or a collaborative excavation plan. Students also evaluate competing interpretations of the past and develop a narrative that incorporates multiple understandings of material culture.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3380 - Maya Archeology

    • This course is designed to introduce students to the ancient Maya, whose civilization flourished in the lowlands of Central America between 1000 B.C. and A.D. 1500. It also examines reasons for the rise and fall of classic Maya civilization, including topics such as the development of complexity, settlement, subsistence, art and architecture, ritual and religion, and intellectual achievements.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3305
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3390 - Lab in Archeology

    • This course introduces laboratory methods through a project-oriented, hands-on format. A major focus of the course is on the inferential processes through which archaeologists recover and understand the past. This course also introduces many of the important principles and concepts that archaeologists use to analyze, manage, curate, and publish artifacts and the data associated with them. In addition, it allows the opportunity to have some hands-on experience with artifacts. Hands-on experiments in class help reinforce the theoretical concepts. Finally, the main goal is for the student to get basic “literacy” with respect to archaeological analysis and develop good lab habits rather than master any particular kind of analysis.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3305
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3397 - Anthropology Practicum

    • This course is a structured field-based or on-campus research experience in a supervised setting related to anthropology. Practical experience is combined with scholarly research in the topical area of the practicum under the guidance of a faculty committee. Projects are selected in advance of the semester of the practicum. Students learn to apply research skills in a practical setting.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3300, ANTH 4450, 90 credit hours completed, and permission of the instructor
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3398 - Internship in Anthropology

    • A structured off-campus experience in a supervised setting that is related to the student’s major. Practical experience is combined with scholarly research in the topical area of the internship, under the guidance of an interdisciplinary faculty committee. Sites must be selected in advance of the semester of the internship.

      Note: A departmental internship orientation session is scheduled once a semester.

    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3300, ANTH 4450, 90 credit hours completed, and permission of the instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3521 - Ethnography of Media: Global Perspectives

    • This course examines how media images and usage shape the identities of individuals and groups around the world. Drawing on ethnographic studies done by anthropologists, this course prepares students to see how representations of peoples, places, practices, and events in the media shape our ideas about others and ourselves. Individuals’ and groups’ relationship with the media is the key element in understanding how people relate to each other within and across cultures and political boundaries.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102, ANTH 2105, or permission of the instructor
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3777 - Global Ethnographies of Labor

    • This course establishes the centrality of labor in understanding social identities and social change around the world. It emphasizes the cross-cultural meaning of “labor.” Through ethnographies it locates the effects of larger global processes like development, war, tourism and their changing impact on meaning of labor for people’s individual and collective identities
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 3999 - Anthropology of Gender

    • This course introduces students to anthropological approaches of studying gender relationships in various cultural contexts. It familiarizes students with the relationship between feminism and anthropology. It examines how the research of feminist anthropologists shaped the central theoretical, methodological and ethical concerns within anthropology. It also emphasizes why ethnographic methods are essential for understanding the complex gender relationships in a globalizing world.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 4100 - Directed Applied Research

    • This course offers students an opportunity to investigate anthropologically-oriented concepts and issues by assisting in faculty-led research or scholarship. Course content and instructional methodologies are identified by the faculty’s needs and expectations.
    • Prerequisites: Any upper division anthropology course and consent of instructor and chair.
    • Credits: 1-6 Credit Hours
  • ANTH 4400 - Directed Study in Anthropology

    • Covers special topics and seminars external to regular course offerings. May include original research projects and practicum experiences.
    • Prerequisites: Approval of instructor and department chair.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • ANTH 4405 - Human Variation

    • This course provides an understanding of the nature and extent of human biological variation, as well as an understanding of how it is studied. The course focuses on two separate yet inter-connected topics: the biological variation that exists within our species, Homo sapiens; and the concept of race.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3301
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 4420 - Lab in Forensic Anthropology

    • This laboratory class provides an overview to the field of forensic anthropology for undergraduates. Forensic anthropology is an applied field of physical anthropology that seeks to recover, identify, and evaluate human skeletal remains within a medico-legal context. This generally includes the determination of an unidentified individual’s sex, age, ancestry, stature, and in many cases, circumstances surrounding death.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3320 or ANTH 1102 and permission of the instructor.
    • Credits: 0-6-3
  • ANTH 4421 - North American Archeology

    • An introduction to archaeological goals, methods, and interpretation of the prehistory of North America.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3305
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 4422 - Archaeology of Asia

    • This course examines cultural and historical developments in Asia from approximately 10,000 BCE through 1600 CE. Students learn about the rise of complex societies, cities, and states; early economies; empires; and the role of archaeology in modern Asia. Along the way, students engage in major debates that have arisen from competing interpretations of the archaeological record.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102 or ASIA 3001.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 4425 - Historical Archeology

    • The course introduces students to methods and issues in American historical archeology. Particular emphasis is placed upon archaeological methods and documentary research, changing gender roles, ethnicity, and technological innovations. Case studies will focus on the South but other regional contexts may also be included.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 3305
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 4430 - Environmental Anthropology Field Methods

    • This course exposes students to the field of environmental anthropology as they experience fieldwork in the natural environments of Georgia. The intensive field methods and research approaches in this course allow students to learn how to work as part of an anthropological research team as they examine and evaluate global research issues in environmental anthropology at the local and regional level. The course includes topical lectures, field methods, lab analysis, and interactive team projects.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 4450 - Research Methods in Anthropology

    • Major theoretical ideas and methods used in anthropological research will be examined with a focus on applying them in research and practice.
    • Prerequisites: MATH 1107, ANTH 3307, and any two of ANTH 3301, ANTH 3303, ANTH 3305.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ANTH 4490 - Special Topics in Anthropology

    • Selected topics of interest to faculty and students.
    • Prerequisites: Prerequisites will vary with each course. The prerequisites will be listed in the schedule of classes.
    • Credits: 3-0-3

Environmental Science (ENVS)

  • ENVS 3730 - Natural Resource Management

    • This is an introductory course designed to provide students with a basic foundation for an understanding of the importance of natural resource conservation within the context of a variety of local, regional, national, and global resource and environmental concerns. This course examines the effects various natural resource management practices have on the quality of life for both present and future generations with much of the material focusing on the concept of sustainable development.
    • Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIOL 2107 and BIOL 2108, or a grade of "C" or better in SCI 1101 and SCI 1102.
    • Credits: 3-0-3

Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

  • GIS 3398 - Internship

    • A structured off-campus experience in a supervised setting that is related to the student's major and career interests. Practical experience is combined with scholarly research under the guidance of GISc faculty and the internship supervisor. Sites must be in advance of the semester of the internship and must be approved by the director of the GISc program.

      Notes: Geography students seeking a B.A. in Geography need to take GEOG 3398.

    • Prerequisites: GEOG 4405 and permission of the GISc program director.
    • Credits: 1-9 Credit Hours
  • GIS 4415 - Practicum in Geographic Information Systems

    • This is a capstone course for the GIS Certificate Program and is designed to integrate students' prior training in geospatial theory, technologies and/or data analyses through the use of geographic information systems in on-site work settings. Student experiences are applied in nature and are on campus or with selected private or public organizations in the community. Students find and obtain their own practicums, which require the program director's approval.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 4405 and permission of the instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3

Geography (GEOG)

  • GEOG 1101 - Introduction to Human Geography

    • This course is a survey of global patterns of resources, population, culture, and economic systems. Emphasis is placed upon the factors contributing to these patterns and the distinctions between the technologically advanced and less advanced regions of the world.
    • Prerequisites: Successful completion of English Learning Support, if required. Successful completion of Mathematics Learning Support or concurrent registration, if required.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 1102 - Earth from Above

    • This is a survey course for any student with an interest in geography, maps, or geospatial data and technologies. Students will obtain fundamental geographic principles of place and space, and learn introductory geospatial techniques such as map reading, coordinate systems, and scale by using global positioning satellite receivers, aerial photos, satellite imagery, and Google Earth technologies. The course is designed to give students hands-on experience to collect, manipulate, analyze, and understand geospatial data.
    • Prerequisites: None.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 1112 - Weather and Climate

    • This course examines aspects of physical geography, specifically earth-sun relationships, atmospheric processes, climate and weather patterns, and vegetation patterns and principles. Emphasis is on the distribution and interactions among these environmental variables as well as the impact humans have had on these natural systems. The lab focuses on practical and applied aspects of these environmental systems. Lab work includes maps reading, data collection, and data analysis.
    • Prerequisites: None.
    • Credits: 3-1-4
  • GEOG 1113 - Introduction to Landforms

    • This course examines aspects of physical geography such as plate tectonics, rocks and soils, river systems, coastal systems, glaciers, and karst topography. Emphasis is on the evolution and distribution of these physical landforms and resultant landscapes, as well as the processes that have shaped them. The lab focuses on practical and applied aspects of landform patterns and processes. Lab work includes the use of topographic maps and aerial photographs, the identification of rocks and minerals, and the analysis of landscape features.
    • Prerequisites: None.
    • Credits: 3-1-4
  • GEOG 1130 - World Regional Geography

    • An introduction to world regions through the context of human geography. The course focuses on basic geographic concepts to analyze social, economic and political issues at local, regional and global scales. Elements of fundamental physical geography will be discussed to illustrate the spatial relationships between the physical environment and human geography.

       Notes: Offered as an online course.

    • Prerequisites: None.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 2105 - Social Issues: Perspectives in Geography

    • This course provides students with the knowledge and tools necessary to critically examine world social issues from the social science perspective of geography. The discipline of geography examines social issues at various scales and from spatial, areal, human-environmental interaction, and physical perspectives.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099.
    • Credits: 2-0-2
  • GEOG 2200 - Research Methods

    • This course is designed to prepare students for scientific research in the environmental field and related disciplines. It introduces students to a variety of spatial and environmental research concepts, approaches, methods and techniques. This course guides students through aspects of scientific research.
    • Prerequisites: (ANTH 1102 , or GEOG 1101 , or GEOG 1130) and (GEOG 1112 or GEOG 1113) and GEOG 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3300 - Urban Geography

    • An analysis of the location and distribution of urban centers, urban land uses and the geographical aspects of general urban issues.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3305 - Introduction to Cartographic Processes

    • This course is an introduction to the processes and technology of cartography, the science and art of map making. The foundations of map construction and design will be presented from theoretical and applied perspectives. Students will be introduced to hands-on and computerized mapping, leading to a basic appreciation of the map as the integral component of geographic information systems data analysis. SSED majors this course will not count as an upper division GEOG requirement for your degree program.
    • Prerequisites: MATH 1107; CSIS 2300; and GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3310 - Historical Geography

    • A global approach to the study of the geographic factors affecting historical events associated with the human exploration and settlement of the planet. The influence of geography on economic and political changes over time will be reviewed for selected historical phenomena.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3312 - Geography of Europe

    • A geographical survey of Europe and its environs, with emphasis on the tremendous diversity found in both the physical and human geography of the region. Economic, political and cultural geography are examined within the framework of the forces that are rapidly restructuring European landscapes of Eastern and Western Europe.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3315 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    • Students will be introduced to the basic design of state-of-the-art GIS and its analytical capabilities. Topics include: Geodatabases, applications in GIS, map projection information, raster/vector data models, introduction to available data on the internet, and basic GIS analytical functions such as querying and overlaying. The course will use ArcGIS to introduce these concepts in a hands-on environment.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 3305 or permission of instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3320 - Political Geography

    • This course is intended to explore the following concepts and issues from a geographical perspective: territoriality, theories of the state, spatial expressions of ideology, boundary issues, imperialism, geopolitics, nationalism, electoral geography, national identity, religion and governing power in a spatial context, and cultural and/or economic hegemony.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3330 - Economic Geography

    • A geographic analysis of global resources and economic growth. The underlying theme of the course is the impact of space (location, distance, area, boundaries) on economic decision making. Topics to be discussed include population, transportation, rural and urban land use, industrial location, natural resource management, and development/underdevelopment. Differing spatial theories will be employed to explain the global economy in transition.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3340 - Cultural Geography

    • A thematic approach is applied to analyze human cultures, to examine world cultural regions, to note the spread of cultural traits, to interpret interactions between culture and environment, and to appreciate multiple traits of cultures and cultural landscapes. The five themes of region, diffusion, ecology, integration, and landscape are used to explore historical and contemporary issues of population, agriculture, politics, language, religion, ethnicity, popular culture, and urban spaces. The philosophy of the course is based on the premise that the built environment is a spatial expression of the beliefs, attitudes, and practices of a people.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3350 - Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa

    • A spatial survey that focuses on the physical, historical, cultural, and economic forces at work on the African continent, south of the Sahara. Special emphasis is placed on the roles of the natural environment, population geography, historical geography, agriculture, economic development, and other factors that shape the landscapes of Sub-Saharan Africa.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3360 - Geography of Asia

    • This course is designed as a survey of the physical and cultural geography of the Asian region. Students will be provided with an overview of Asian landform features and climate coupled with a discussion of human interaction with a variety of Asian landscapes in terms of historical, political, economic, religious, and ethnic factors using geographic and cartographic analytical techniques.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3370 - Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean

    • This course studies the major physical, cultural and geopolitical sub-regions in Latin America and the Caribbean. In-depth geographic awareness and knowledge of the Latin American and Caribbean region is gained from the study of physical landscapes, natural hazards, economics, historical geography, environmental and resource issues, cultures and societies, urbanization, development, current events, and prospects for the future.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3380 - Geography of North America

    • A geographical survey of North America emphasizing the significant diversity found in both the physical and human geography of the region. Past, current and changing locational arrangements of people and resources are examined as they relate to economic, political, urban and cultural geographic perspectives within the framework of the forces that have created the variety of landscapes of the North American continent.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 1101 or GEOG 2105.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3398 - Internship

    • A structured off-campus experience in a supervised setting that is related to the student’s major and career interests. Practical experience is combined with scholarly research under the guidance of geography faculty and the internship supervisor. Those seeking experience in a GIS environment will work under the guidance of the GIS Program Director. Sites must be in advance of the semester of the internship and must be approved by the student’s advisor or internship coordinator.

      Note: This course is for GEOG majors. GIS majors should register for GIS 3398 and GIS certificate students should register for GIS 4415. A departmental internship orientation session is scheduled once a semester.

    • Prerequisites: GEOG 4405 for GIS internships, or at least 15 hours of upper division geography courses for non-GIS internships.
    • Credits: 1-9 Credit Hours
  • GEOG 3700 - Introduction to Environmental Studies

    • This course is designed to give students an overview of the human dimensions of US environmental issues and is a core course for the environmental studies minor. From a geographical perspective, the course explores how US environmental laws, ethics, viewpoints and economics interact, shape, and manifest themselves across the landscape. Students will be introduced to technologies, such as geographic information systems and satellite images, used by geographers to study environmental issues. The course will examine spatial patterns arising from the ways in which we manage our natural resources and environment. Natural resources such as water, air, soil, energy and fossil fuels will be used as examples in the discussion of spatial patterns arising from resource extraction, transportation and use.
    • Prerequisites: Any general education science lab sequence.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3710 - Local & Global Sustainability

    • This course is a critical review of the concept of sustainability and sustainable development in theory and practice. Students analyze ideological arguments, sustainability indicators and other tools, and case studies of sustainability projects worldwide. Students examine different interpretations of sustainability across the globe with special attention given to how sustainability is viewed and implemented in both the developed (core) and developing (periphery) regions.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and 75 credit hours.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3800 - Climatology

    • This course examines the nature of Earth's climate and the physical processes that determine the variations in climate and weather worldwide. Emphasis is on the interactions among the atmosphere, the hydrologic cycle, and earth's surface. Aspects of climate change will also be addressed.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 1112 and any general education lab science sequence.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 3900 - Biogeography

    • This course examines the geographic distribution of plants and animals from historical, cultural, and ecological perspectives. Emphasis is on the local, regional, and global patterns and processes that have influenced the distribution and evolution of plant and animal species. Aspects of environmental change and conservation is also addressed.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 1112
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 4100 - Directed Applied Research

    • This course will offer students an opportunity to investigate geographically-oriented concepts and issues by assisting in faculty-led research or scholarship. Course content and instructional methodologies will be identified by the faculty's needs and expectations.
    • Prerequisites: Any upper division geography course; consent of instructor and chair.
    • Credits: 1-6 Credit Hours
  • GEOG 4200 - Research Methods

    • This course is designed to prepare students for scientific research in the environmental field and related disciplines. It introduces students to a variety of spatial and environmental research concepts, approaches, methods and techniques. This course guides students through aspects of scientific research. This course is cross-listed with ENVS 4200 and may count toward the Geography or Environmental Analysis and Sustainability degree. Students earning credit for GEOG 4200 may not earn credit for ENVS 4200.
    • Prerequisites: 60 credit hours and SCI 1101 or SCI 1102 or GEOG 1112 or GEOG 1113 or CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 4400 - Directed Study

    • Covers special topics and seminars external to regular course offerings.
    • Prerequisites: Approval of advisor, instructor, major area committee and department chair prior to registration.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • GEOG 4405 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems

    • This course builds upon basic concepts addressed in the Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) course. The use of topological data procedures and relational database concepts within the GIS context will be investigated along with procedures relevant to building Geodatabases, including map projections, coordinate systems, digitizing vectors, and transformations. Fundamental spatial analysis operations are expanded upon, including spatial query, address matching, spatial aggregations, buffering, polygon overlay, and point-in polygon operations.

      Note: ArcGIS software is used in class.

    • Prerequisites: GIS 3315
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 4410 - Introduction to Remote Sensing

    • Remote sensing is the art and science of obtaining information about an object, area, or phenomenon by a device that is not in contact with the study subject. Remote sensing methods include the production and analyses of satellite imagery and aerial photography as well as basic digital image processing techniques. This course is an introduction to remote sensing from space and aircraft platforms and an introduction to digital photogrammetry.
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 4405 or permission of instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 4490 - Special Topics in Geography

    • Selected topics of interest to faculty and students.
    • Prerequisites: Approval of instructor and department chair.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • GEOG 4499 - Senior Seminar in Geography

    • Required capstone course for all geography and GISc majors. This seminar helps students apply their geographic knowledge and skills culminating in a research project. The course also includes preparation for graduate study and job opportunities in geography.
    • Prerequisites: SSRM 2301 or equivalent, and at least 18 hours upper division required geography courses, and permission of instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 4500 - Advanced Topics in Geospatial Science

    • This course examines advanced topics in geospatial science that fit the needs and interests of students and faculty. Example topics include geospatial techniques in urban or environmental ssytems, advanced cartography, advanced remote sensing, ArcGIS server, geospatial databases, project management, and global positioning system applications. This course can be taken more than once as long as it is not identical in content.
    • Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in GEOG 3315 or GEOG 4405 or GEOG 4410, and permission of the instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 7701 - Peoples of the World

    • Understanding diversity is the cornerstone of this course, which presents comparisons of human groups throughout the world in a geographic case study format, focusing on cultural, political, economic, and social themes. Students will develop culturally-focused and geographically-based lesson plan strategies and present their research in a seminar format. The use of international resources from academic and local communities adds to the advancement of disciplinary knowledge and cultural awareness.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GEOG 7900 - Special Topics

    • Special topics of interest to faculty and students.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education and permission of advisor, instructor, department chair, and director, graduate study in education.
    • Credits: 1-9 Credit Hours
  • GEOG 7950 - Directed Study

    • This course covers special topics external to regular course offerings.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education and permission of advisor, instructor, department chair, and director, graduate study in education.
    • Credits: 1-9 Credit Hours